Hall of Fame Induction Class of 2010

Predrag Durkovic

The men's basketball program was only three years old when Predrag "Pretz" Durkovic began attending Goucher in 1993. Prior to his arrival, the Gophers never won as many as 10 games in a season or finished above .500, nor did they seriously contend for a Capital Athletic Conference championship or come close to qualifying for the NCAA Division III Championships.

But the program's fortunes started to improve dramatically once Durkovic came aboard. In his first game with the Gophers, he played only 13 minutes, but scored 16 points in a 113-69 victory over Wesley. The first 20-point performance of his career came just four games later, again against the Wolverines. He went on to average 14.9 points and 7.3 rebounds per contest as a freshman, earning second-team All-CAC honors, and Goucher won its first CAC title in the sport of men's basketball.

"He was the final piece of the puzzle,” head coach Leonard Trevino said of Durkovic. "When Predrag joined our program, we went from being a team ‘on the rise' to one that could play with anybody and wouldn't back down from anybody.”

"Pretz" Durkovic was a second-team All-CAC selection again in 1994-95 when he averaged 16.0 points and 8.2 rebounds per game and Goucher successfully defended its CAC championship. This time the Gophers were rewarded with a spot in the NCAA Division III playoffs where, in the opening round, they knocked off Lebanon Valley, the defending national champions.

Durkovic was placed on the All-CAC first team as both a junior and a senior, plus he landed on a number of all-region squads. In his final season, the Gophers captured their third CAC title and returned to the NCAA Division III tournament where they defeated Cabrini, 67-60, in the first round, before being eliminated by Alvernia, 60-55.

In his four seasons at Goucher, the Gophers were 74-35.

At the time of his induction, Durkovic ranked first all-time in rebounds (918) and blocked shots (75), and second in points (1,643) in the history of Goucher's men's basketball program. He still shared the school record for most rebounds in a game (19).

 

Josephine E. Fiske

For portions of eight decades prior to her death in May 2006 at age 101, Josephine E. Fiske taught physical education classes and coached women's athletics at Goucher College.

 Jo Fiske joined Goucher's staff in 1929 as an assistant in the physical education department and eventually worked her way up to chair of the department before retiring in 1970. She returned to teach part-time in 1976 and continued to do so beyond her 90th birthday.

 The two sports at Goucher to which Jo Fiske is most often linked as a coach are field hockey and basketball. Although records from that era are spotty, they show her achieving a .755 winning percentage and five of her teams going undefeated in her 21 seasons as the field hockey coach.

 For some of the same sports she coached, Jo Fiske also worked as a referee. She officiated high school and college basketball games until 1970, lacrosse until 1986 and field hockey until 1988, plus she pioneered the establishment of referee associations such as the Baltimore Basketball Board of Officials in 1931.

 Recognized as a longtime advocate for women in sports, Jo Fiske developed a national reputation for her professional knowledge and experience in athletics and physical education. For a time the 1926 graduate of Mount Holyoke College, who later earned a master's degree in guidance and counseling from Columbia University's Teachers College, served as president of the National Association for Girls and Women in Sports and as vice president of the American Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation.

In 1996, Goucher presented Jo Fiske with its highest tribute for contributions to the college, the John Franklin Goucher Medal of Service, and in 1998, honored her by naming its field hockey facility after her.

The Josephine E. Fiske Gopher Pride Award, initiated in February 1986 by the Baltimore Field Hockey Association, is presented annually to as many as two student-athletes to recognize sportsmanship, citizenship, positive attitude, leadership and service to young adults or children.

 

Judith Devlin Hashman

Without question, Judith Devlin Hashman ranks among the best badminton players of all time. Not just at Goucher. Not just in Maryland or the United States. One of the best in the world.

Devlin began playing badminton when she was seven years old under the tutelage of her father, J. Frank Devlin, one of the world's top players of his day.

In 1954 at age 18, she won her first women's world singles championship, becoming both the youngest person and the first American to do it. Prior to that, she placed first an amazing six times at the 18-and-under U.S. junior nationals.

During her playing career, Judy Devlin won no fewer than 83 national or international titles, including 12 U.S. women's singles championships, 12 U.S. women's doubles championships, eight U.S. mixed doubles championships, 10 world women's singles championships and seven world women's doubles championships.

She played at No. 1 singles and No. 1 doubles on U.S. Uber Cup teams that captured successive world championships in 1957, 1960 and 1963. 

Judith Devin Hashman was inducted into the U.S. Badminton Hall of Fame in 1963, the International Women's Sports Hall of Fame in 1995 and the International Badminton Federation Hall of Fame in 1997.

Badminton was not the only sport in which Judy Devlin excelled. She was a member of the US Women's Lacrosse Team from 1954-60 and also a member of the Junior Wightman Tennis Cup Squad.

 

Susan Devlin Peard

Susan Devlin Peard is a former badminton player who represented both the United States and Ireland in international competition. She is the daughter of the late J. Frank Devlin, who himself was one of the world's top players of his day.

At Goucher College, Sue Devlin played on the lacrosse team, earning varsity letters four years and managing the team in 1951-52.

Sue Devlin won numerous international women's doubles championships while paired with her younger sister, Judith Devlin Hashman. Among them were six titles at the prestigious All-England Championships (1954, 1956, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1966) and a record 10 U.S. women's doubles titles between 1953 and 1966. The Devlin sisters also formed a doubles pairing that won all of its matches for the U.S. Uber Cup (women's international) teams of 1957 and 1960.

After marrying Irish badminton player Frank Peard in 1960, Sue Devlin won a pair of Irish national women's doubles titles, plus she also represented Ireland in the Uber Cup competitions which crowned champions in 1963 and 1966.

Susan Devlin Peard was inducted into the U.S. Badminton Hall of Fame in 1976.

 

Class of 2011

Class of 2012

Class of 2013

Class of 2014

For portions of eight decades prior to her death in May 2006 at age 101, Josephine E. Fiske taught physical education classes and coached women's athletics at Goucher College.

 

Jo Fiske joined Goucher's staff in 1929 as an assistant in the physical education department and eventually worked her way up to chair of the department before retiring in 1970. She returned to teach part-time in 1976 and continued to do so beyond her 90th birthday.

 

The two sports at Goucher to which Jo Fiske is most often linked as a coach are field hockey and basketball. Although records from that era are spotty, they show her achieving a .755 winning percentage and five of her teams going undefeated in her 21 seasons as the field hockey coach.

 

For some of the same sports she coached, Jo Fiske also worked as a referee. She officiated high school and college basketball games until 1970, lacrosse until 1986 and field hockey until 1988, plus she pioneered the establishment of referee associations such as the Baltimore Basketball Board of Officials in 1931.

 

Recognized as a longtime advocate for women in sports, Jo Fiske developed a national reputation for her professional knowledge and experience in athletics and physical education. For a time the 1926 graduate of Mount Holyoke College, who later earned a master's degree in guidance and counseling from Columbia University's Teachers College, served as president of the National Association for Girls and Women in Sports and as vice president of the American Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation.

 

In 1996, Goucher presented Jo Fiske with its highest tribute for contributions to the college, the John Franklin Goucher Medal of Service, and in 1998, honored her by naming its field hockey facility after her.

 

The Josephine E. Fiske Gopher Pride Award, initiated in February 1986 by the Baltimore Field Hockey Association, is presented annually to as many as two student-athletes to recognize sportsmanship, citizenship, positive attitude, leadership and service to young adults or children.